Monthly Archive for March, 2013

FREE CAREER ADVICE IMMEDIATELY AVAILABLE

The path to career success is going through a rough patch in a troubled economy environment. The need for common sense career coaching has not been greater in recent memory.

Turbulent times not withstanding, I can provide you with common sense coaching that will help you to translate your ambitions into the rewards you deserve: promotions, money and personal satisfaction. No charge, no obligation.

What’s my payoff? I’ve been fortunate to enjoy a rewarding career. Now, I want to share what I have learned with you and others who are working diligently to achieve career success. My reward will be in knowing that I have helped you to succeed to the best of your abilities.

The career advice I provide is based on my experience in major corporations, including Senior VP at American Express. My qualifications also include experience as an entrepreneur, professional director, consultant on career and business strategies and author.

I deliver my career coaching via my blog, one-on-one career counseling and books

This blog provides opportunities for you to post your opinions on career-related issues, share your career concerns and engage others in discussions. Plus, you can get one-on-one career advice via ramon@commonsenseatwork.com >

You’ll find recommendations for books, articles and ezines  that will help you accelerate your career.

For more information please visit my websisite www.commonsenseatwork.com/job-advice-principles > E-mail me at ramon@commonsenseatwork.com with your suggestions for adding other resources.

You have everything to gain and absolutely nothing to lose, except the roadblocks on your path to career success.

I wish you success!

Ramon Greenwood, The Career Coach

Common Sense At Work

 

 

Part II – Q&A For Creating An Outstanding Resume

If a career transition is in your future in 2013, you need a strong resume to differentiate yourself  from the masses.  Ivy Exec’s resume writer – Staci Collins – held an interactive Q & A session to answer members’ pressing resume questions.

This Q & A session is summarized here for you…

On Line Requirements

Q:  What special requirements does the on-line environment impose on job seekers?

A: 90%+ of companies use LinkedIn in hiring. What does this mean?

–You don’t need 500+ connections, but you need more than 20.  That being said, if you are in sales, business development, consulting, and other relationship roles, probably more connections is better than fewer.

–Companies value well written, thoughtful on-line recommendations as long as they are from managers and clients and they reference “specific stories” about you/your performance.  They don’t like endorsements.  Endorsements are perceived as “manufactured” – not authentic.

–Use a current picture. An out of date picture is perceived as “out of touch,” “less relevant.”

–Use the skills section to put in your profession/sector’s key words. You should research key words that are common to your profession.  Recruiters search on the skills sections and on company names.

–Be a joiner.  Join company alumni groups, school alumni groups, professional associations.  Recruiters search these as well, seeking smaller, more select pools.

Formatting

Q:  “1 page vs. multiple page resume for experienced candidates….I don’t know what to leave out if it’s just a one-pager…”

A: Recruiters don’t care.  Companies, though,  typically don’t want 5 pages — only 1 or 2 maximum.

–If you have 15 years or less, keep it to 1 page.

–If you have more than 15 years of experience you can go to two pages.  Companies care about the last 5 years the most, but if your meaningful contributions go back further, you should include them.

–The number of pages can also depend on the industry.  For example, in high tech, some highly experienced executives have one page resumes.

–It’s important to get industry specialized/industry-specific  feedback on your resume.

Q:  Should I take the dates off college?

A: You can, but people will know you are “hiding” the dates.  You will have to deal with age at some point, so you might as well be up front about it.

Q:  How should you address periods of unemployment?

A: This is the same as above.  It’s best to be up front about it.  If you are doing a chronologically formatted resume there shouldn’t be any blanks. If you are unemployed, volunteer!  It’s better to have some “value-adding” activity, than blank space.

Q:  For a consulting background, do you recommend using general bullets to cover multiple clients or speaking to specific projects?

A: You need to be specific.

Q:  Functional vs. Chronological?

A: Recruiters and hiring managers want a brief story in orderFormat your resume in reverse chronological order by company.  When you have a functional resume it’s a lot of work for recruiters and hiring managers to map contributions to where and to when. You want to make your background/contributions user friendly.

Staci has over 15 years of experience partnering with managers at all levels to achieve their career objectives. She has worked at Accenture and Ernst & Young in change management, HR, and strategic planning. She received her MBA from the University of California – Haas, and BA from Harvard.

To get personalized advice on your resume from Staci or inquire about Ivy Exec’s resume writing options, please email resumes@ivyexec.com

I wish you career success!

Ramon Greenwood, The Career Coach

Common Sense At Work

Part I — Q&A For Creating An Outstanding Resume

(This is part one of a four-part series to be posted today and the next three Mondays.)

If a career transition is in your future in 2013, a strong, executive caliber resume is a must.  Our senior resume writer – Staci Collins – held an interactive Q & A session last week to answer members’ burning resume questions.  This valuable Q & A session is summarized here for your reference…

Recruiter Requirements

Q:  What do recruiters want to see in a resume?

A: Recruiters screen hundreds of resumes daily.  On average they spend 2 to 3 seconds per resume.  They source candidates from proprietary networks such as Ivy Exec and LinkedIn.

–Recruiters want to quickly see a clear declaration of what you do, for whom, in what sectors and with what results/contributions.

–You must be present on LinkedIn.

–Different professions absolutely require different resumes. Different jobs require different resumes.  One size does NOT fit all.

–Results/contributions must be quantified.

Company Requirements

Q:  What do companies want to see in a resume?

A: Companies want to see that candidates understand their resume is and isn’t about them.  It’s really about the companies they worked for and the contributions they made to those companies.

–You need to research companies/sectors you are applying to so you can gauge industry practices/terminology and incorporate them.

–You need to clearly show why elements on your resume mattered to the company and the end results achieved. Focus on contributions….NOT responsibilities.

–You need to show years of experience, what sectors you worked in, what types of clients you helped.

–You need  to show obstacles you/your team faced and overcame.

–You must quantify results as much as possible to achieve credibility — think metric supported facts….NOT vague assertions.

Stay tuned for upcoming blog posts that will provide practical answers to resume questions about format, content, career changes, and more…

- – – – – -

Staci has over 15 years of experience partnering with managers at all levels to achieve their career objectives. She has worked at Accenture and Ernst & Young in change management, HR, and strategic planning. She received her MBA from the University of California – Haas, and BA from Harvard.

To get personalized advice on your resume from Staci or inquire about Ivy Exec’s resume writing options, please email resumes@ivyexec.com

I wish you success with your career!

Ramon Greenwood, The Head Coach

Common Sense At Work

 

 

Grist For Your Career Path

“One of the main reasons why most people don’t get what they want is they haven’t decided what they want. They haven’t defined their desires in clear and compelling detail.” A quote from Jack Canfield’s excellent book, The Success Principles.

Ask your self where your want to be, say five years from now. Assess what your strengths are today. Define what you have to do to get from where you are to where you want to be in five years.

And then work with all of your energy and strength to close the gap from here to there.

I wish you career success!!!

Ramon Greeenwood, The Career Coach

Common Sense At Work