Monthly Archive for November, 2011

How To Get The Pay Raise You’ve Earned

If you are not getting the raise you believe you’ve earned I think you will find my new ebook helpful.

Getting a raise in salary and perks is not an easy undertaking, especially in these difficult times, but the odds for success can be significantly increased by executing the strategic plan spelled out in this new ebook, titled “How To Get The Pay Raise You’ve Earned.”

“How To Get The Pay Raise You’ve Earned” sets out comprehensive guidelines that will help you work your way through the challenge of negotiating the sensitive issues of why you deserve a raise. It also provides tips for how to avoid shooting yourself in the foot when you get an answer. Case histories of how not to campaign for a raise are included.

A successful campaign for a raise begins by recognizing the matter of your compensation is strictly a business proposition. You are not asking for a favor.

You have a service to sell (your expertise and your time). Your employer is the buyer. You must make the case that increasing your pay package is a sound investment that will pay off for your employer. In other words, the goal is to convince him that you are worth the price.

I have written this timely ebook based on my wide-ranging career, including serving as senior vice president of American Express; a professional director of a number of companies; entrepreneur; author; and career coach. He is currently The Career Coach at Common Sense At Work.

“How To Get The Pay Raise You’ve Earned” is available for immediate downloading from Amazon.com for $1.99.

I wish you success in getting the raise you’ve earned.

Ramon Greenwood, The Career Coach

Common Sense At Work

 

 

Three Steps To Career Success

If you are not getting what you want in your career one major reason may be you haven’t decided what you want.

The first step toward a successful career is to clearly define your goals. Until you take this step you can’t know how to prepare to achieve them. In other words, if you don’t know where you are going you can’t get there.

The second step is to prepare an action plan to get you to your goals. This can include applying to schools and universities which will prepare you for your career. Part of this process will include deciding what degree you may want to attain; deciding whether it would be an accounting or business degree. Be sure to include a timeline. Stick to it.

The third step is to begin immediately to execute your career plan. Right now, not later today or tomorrow. If you’ve always dreamt of becoming an attorney for example, check out online law degrees and start following your dream.”

Only you, and you alone, can define what will mean success.

Only you, and you alone, can take the actions necessary to enjoy a successful career.

I wish you success!!!!

Ramon Greenwood, The Career Coach

Common Sense At Work

P.S. I am excited to tell you that early next week I will be announcing the publication of my new ebook titled “How To Get The Pay Raise You’ve Earned.”

 

 

 

Career Counseling: Lessons From Steve Jobs

I’ve been mesmerized for the past few weeks by all of the media coverage of the death of Steve Jobs. I have been especially impressed with Walter Isaacson’s excellent book titled simply “Steve Jobs.”

There are many lessons (both positive and negative) to be learned from Jobs’ career, as well as from the conclusions being drawn by various writers.

Consider this observation from one review of Isaacson’s book: “Most companies are managed in a way that keeps them producing what they already know how to produce. They play it safe. That’s why most companies fail to reach their true potential.”

Stop a minutes to ask yourself: Does this apply to how I manage my career?True career success requires reaching out into new territories, which will be populated with risks and opportunities.

To move ahead you have to be willing to leave some of the old things behind. Jobs was famous for casting out old products that did not meet his high standards for serving consumers’ needs and desires. He built his legend by focusing on three or four of the important products and issues at any given time.

Also, if you are to move forward with your career you have to form new relationships, particularly with people from whom you can learn and those who can contribute to your well-being. This may mean leaving behind old relationships that are easy and comfortable.

One has to gather new knowledge and acquire new skills to build a successful career. Some wise person has said, “If you keep on doing what you have been doing you are going to get the same results.

Products and attitudes (the total of your performance on the job) that are merely adequate are not good enough to put you ahead of the pack.

Reach out to grasp new responsibilities; embrace new ideas.

Have high expectations—even some that may seem irrational—for your career. Believe that you are more capable and more valuable than your present position allows.

While keeping the “big picture” of your ultimate goals in mind is critical, at the same time, it is necessary to pay meticulous attention to the day-to-day details that are required for success.

Sure, taking these steps to advance your career involves risks and discomfort. But remember, it is chipped in stone that when nothing is ventured, nothing is gained.

I wish you career success!

Ramon Greenwood, The Career Coach

Common Sense At Work (Copyright 2011)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Career Counseling: Lessons From Steve Jobs

 

I’ve been mesmerized for the past few weeks by all of the media coverage of the death of Steve Jobs. I have been especially impressed with Walter Isaacson’s excellent book titled simply “Steve Jobs.”

 

There are many lessons (both positive and negative) to be learned from Jobs’ career, as well as from the conclusions being drawn by various writers.

 

Consider this observation from one review of Isaacson’s book: “Most companies are managed in a way that keeps them producing what they already know how to produce. They play it safe. That’s why most companies fail to reach their true potential.”

 

Stop a minutes to ask yourself: Does this apply to how I manage my career?

 

True career success requires reaching out into new territories, which will be populated with risks and opportunities.

 

To move ahead you have to be willing to leave some of the old things behind. Jobs was famous for casting out old products that did not meet his high standards for serving consumers’ needs and desires. He built his legend by focusing on three or four of the important products and issues at any given time.

 

Also, if you are to move forward with your career you have to form new relationships, particularly with people from whom you can learn and those who can contribute to your well-being. This may mean leaving behind old relationships that are easy and comfortable.

 

 

 

One has to gather new knowledge and acquire new skills to build a successful career. Some wise person has said, “If you keep on doing what you have been doing you are going to get the same results.

 

Products and attitudes (the total of your performance on the job) that are merely adequate are not good enough to put you ahead of the pack.

 

Reach out to grasp new responsibilities; embrace new ideas.

 

Have high expectations—even some that may seem irrational—for your career. Believe that you are more capable and more valuable than your present position allows.

 

While keeping the “big picture” of your ultimate goals in mind is critical, at the same time, it is necessary to pay meticulous attention to the day-to-day details that are required for success.

 

Sure, taking these steps to advance your career involves risks and discomfort. But remember, it is chipped in stone that when nothing is ventured, nothing is gained.

 

I wish you career success!

 

Ramon Greenwood, The Career Coach

Common Sense At Work (Copyright 2011)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Career Advice: How To Gain Confidence At Work

I think you’ll find this posting by Kate Croston to be very interesting and inspiring.

Confidence is an underutilized resource. Confidence is the reason people get hired, get dates, and get respect. But why does it seem like people are either overconfident or under-confident? Where is that magic medium; that point at which confidence is at its peak without going over the top? What should confidence look like?

  • Confidence should be calm. Anyone who is truly confident is not frightened or nervous. Confidence is facing your fears and knowing that you have made the best choice possible. There should be an inner peace and tranquility in true confidence.
  • Confidence can be faked. Sometimes, in fact most of the time, confidence does not come naturally. True confidence is the result of feeling secure in an insecure world. But if you can’t feel it naturally, feel free to fake it. The great thing about confidence is that if you pretend to be confident for long enough, eventually you actually become confident.
  • Confidence is different than pride. Pride will get you fired, confidence will get you hired. Pride says, ‘I’m better than you.’ Confidence says, ‘I’m the best.’ A subtle difference, but an important one. Be sure of your abilities without lording it over others.
  • Confidence is not blind. Even if you are confident in your decisions, that doesn’t mean you can’t change them. Another great thing about confidence is that it isn’t brittle. It can change and adapt. If someone has a better idea, you can still be confident and follow them.
  • Confidence is leadership, even when following. It may sound counter-intuitive, but leaders can follow without losing their leadership- if they are confident. Confidence makes a leader. People want to follow confident people because they look like they know where they are going. However, confident leaders can still follow others without losing their leadership. Taking on a partner, starting down a different path, even taking control of another’s project are all acceptable as long as you maintain your confidence.

Confidence can seem like a complex thing, but in reality it is simple. If you believe in yourself, others will believe in you too. Keep your eyes on the goal, your head up, and keep moving. You can only make the best of a difficult situation. Once you uncover what the best thing to do is, do it with confidence. You can always, confidently, change directions later.

Author Bio:
Kate Croston is a freelance writer, holds a bachelors degree in Journalism and Mass Communication. She writes guest posts for different sites and loves contributing internet service <http://www.internetservice.net/>  related topics. Questions or comments can be sent to:  katecroston.croston09 @ gmail.com <http://gmail.com> .

I wish you career success!

Ramon Greenwood, The Career Coach

Common Sense At Work